To be in love is to feel unstoppable. Even in a strange and scary world.

For Elodie and Otto, a French schoolgirl and teenage German soldier in 1944 Occupied France, this situation is all too real.

Cruelty is everywhere. Despair is endemic. The rules of living have been turned on their heads. What is goodness in a world at war?

Elodie and Otto are living in a time of extremes.

But somehow, amongst all this, they find each other in the darkness. Caught in the middle of a war, two teenagers take shelter from the world outside. They muck around. They talk. They touch. They fall in love. And it’s a little bit of a miracle. A new life.

Elodie and Otto are at the heart of This Beautiful Future. Two young people locked in a moment in time, clutching each other beneath bedcovers as they unknowingly approach the end of war and life as they know it. Their innocence is that of children, who will be judged as adults come morning. Their hope is of the hopeless. It’s joyful, beautiful, and painful.

Why are we making a love story in our own time of extremes? And why this story in particular?

2016 left us divided and scared. Sometimes it is right to reflect these feelings back, to make shows that have hard edges and hard-nosed politics. But not always. Sometimes what we need is to look for the humanity amongst the rubble. To speak about how we long to be better. To laugh. To hope. To love.

This Beautiful Future encourages us to look back in order to look forward; to draw a connection between 1944, a time in which the world was exploding into violence, and today.

But more than this, This Beautiful Future is a show that reminds us to look for tenderness amongst the chaos. To imagine a beautiful future. To seek it out.

 Even if it’s futile. Even if we’re scared. Even if it’s just for one night.